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Mars will seem larger, redder, and brighter on October 13 — and won’t get this near to Earth again till 2035

Mars will be at its sharpest this month on October 13. And the Red Planet will not occur this bright again until 2035.

It is due to the reason that  Mars will be at its  opponent

According to Sky and Telescope. What this practically means is, the planet is instantly opposite the Sun in the sky. And, Earth is bang in the interior between the two.

As per the reports on that day, Mars will also be at its absolute apparent size when glimpsed through telescopes.

Highlights

1)Mars the Red Planet was nearest to the Earth on October 6 but will seem the sharpest next week on October 13.

2)On Tuesday, Mars will be at an opponent that is directly opposite to the Sun and making it shine along Earth’s horizon in the Northern Hemisphere.

3)Mars’ resistance year is significant because the planet will also be at its perihelion which means it is the nearest point to the Sun in its orbit around the fiery star.

Two years back, Mars was relatively nearer to Earth than this year which is around 58 million kilometres versus the new 62 million kilometres. 

Nevertheless, atmosphere gazers in the Northern Hemisphere will be in a reasonable stance to catch a glimpse. The mars, the  Red Planet will be farther north and elevated in the sky this year.

As per the report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), this is the period when Mars’ orbit lies “at approximately 38.6 million miles (62.07 million kilometres) from our planet”.

A NASA wing told that “Mars was noticeable for much of the dusk in the southern sky and at its elevated point at about midnight,”

The red planet will, however, be visible through October but will unfold fainter as Mars and Earth wander distant away from each other in their paths around the Sun.

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